Today's schedule is subject to change. Check the NYC14 app (available in late February) for updated details.

8 a.m.- 5 p.m. Thursday 

Apple Award Entries: Enter the David L. Adams Apple Awards, NYC14's best-of-show contest. See a complete list of categories, rules and details here. Bring your entries (and payment, if you haven't paid online) to registration by 5 p.m. Thursday to enter. Winners will be announced at Saturday's closing session. College Media Association • Metropolitan West, Second Floor

8 a.m.-5 p.m. Thursday          

Convention Registration and Check-In: Check in or register for the convention here and receive your name badge, program and more. If you have questions or need help, this is your convention information center. Metropolitan West, Second Floor

8 a.m.-5 p.m. Thursday          

NYC14 Trade Show: NYC14's exhibitors, vendors and sponsors want to meet you -- and show you all they have to offer you and your media organization. Stop by the trade show floor to pick up some goodies, learn about some of the best in the college-media biz and make new connections. Metropolitan West, Second Floor

8-11 a.m. Thursday   

Media Tour Signup: You're here, in the media capital of the world. Some of the biggest players in our field are just outside the hotel doors. Get a glimpse behind their scenes by signing up -- first-come, first-served, and the limited spots fill fast --  to visit them. Then meet your chaperone at the appointed date and time, and you'll join your peers for a walk and talk. College Media AssociationMetropolitan West, Second Floor

9-9:50 a.m. Thursday

Dropping Out Saved My Future Career: Blogging. Social media. Features. News. Print or digital. All factor into the type of journalism we want to embrace upon graduating. But how do you know it's what you want to do until you've immersed yourself in it? Learn about the year the speaker spent covering technology, social media, New York City, politics and education before returning for his senior year with a vastly different understanding of the industry that wasn't being taught in a classroom. Kenneth Rosen, freelance writer and journalist • Conference Room D, Lower Level

 9-9:50 a.m. Thursday

Advising: More Than a Black and White Issue: There is a perception that advisers from historically black colleges and universities have different roles and functions than advisers at traditionally white institutions. But is that the case? This session will allows advisers from HBCUs and TWIs to discuss their challenges. Valerie D. Clark, Florida A&M University; Jermaine Proshee, Southern University • Conference Room C, Lower Level

9-9:50 a.m. Thursday

Building Relationships: Your Career in Sports Media: Go beyond the hollow interactions of "networking" and build your sports media career on meaningful personal relationships. Learn how to diversify your expertise and guarantee you'll never leave a job without a better place to land. This sports expert will share his stories as a veteran of several successful blogs and the Iraq War. Matt Ufford, SB Nation Studios • Conference Room E, Lower Level

 9-9:50 a.m. Thursday

Covering Crisis: When mass shootings, natural disasters, acts of terrorism and other tragedies strike, readers need the news media more thanever. College students are no exception. Come learn from an award-winning international journalist how to best prepare for and manage coverage in a crisis, big or small. Stephen Handelman, director of the Center on Media, Crime and Justice • New York East, Third Floor

9-9:50 a.m. Thursday

Digital Age Leadership: A Print Veteran Enters the Thunderdome: This veteran print newsroom leader now manages a digital "Thunderdome," the newsroom of the future. She'll help you prepare for a job like hers and share tips on how to be a smart leader in your college newsroom. Robyn Tomlin, Digital First Media • New York West, Third Floor

9-9:50 a.m. Thursday

Effective Social Media Guidelines: Elements to Include and Limitations to Consider: With social media use continually increasing, newsrooms need guidelines that encourage effective use of Facebook, Twitter and other outlets but not curb staff members' free speech or creativity. Use common examples to craft a set of policies (or review those in place) that do more than list prohibited actions. Sandy York, Marshall University • Liberty 1&2, Third Floor

9-9:50 a.m. Thursday

Five Ways to Play with Time Effectively: If "Procrastination" is your middle name, join this interactive session to share your excuses for putting things off (there's a prize for the most creative TRUE story). Learn how to put a plan in place BEFORE you are tempted and then design a set of rules about time that will see you getting it all done with plenty to spare. Marcia Meskiel-Macy, MyMediaSeminars  • Liberty 5, Third Floor 

9-9:50 a.m. Thursday

Fundamentals of Libel and Privacy Issues Facing the College Press: We live in a litigious society. Learn how your media organization can avoid the legal pitfalls of libel and privacy issues. Should you purchase libel insurance? How responsible is the editor in the eyes of the court? Bring your questions and examples to share in this interactive session. Roger Soenksen, James Madison University • Conference Room F, Lower Level

9-9:50 a.m. Thursday

I Am Not An Oompa Loompa: Why You Need Diversity in the Newsroom: Overall newsroom employment is dropping, but it's dropping even faster for minority journalists. Newsroom diversity has been treated as an afterthought -- if it's even a thought at all -- as newsrooms struggle with the digital transition. Why is diversity in the newsroom important, and how do you ensure you're doing all you can to be inclusive? This session will help you answer both questions, and likely others, for your newsroom.  Sheena Louise Roetman, Georgia State University • Liberty 4, Third Floor

9-9:50 a.m. Thursday

iHeartRadio Shares the Benefits of Going Digital: Learn from an industry leader about radio trends, the state of digital delivery and how your college station could benefit from a relationship with a digital radio platform. Also featured will be info about how radio can leverage its natural advantages -- enduring brands, popular talent and huge existing audiences - to successfully increase its foothold in the world of online audio entertainment. Larry Linietsky, Clear Channel Media & Entertainment, iHeartRadio • Conference Room H, Lower Level

9-9:50 a.m. Thursday

In Search of Transparency: Covering Closed Presidential Searches: What would you do if your university held a secret search for its next president? Join the discussion as we talk about coverage tactics and strategies, including using public records and public persuasion to hold the university accountable to its stakeholders, including you. Susan Zake, Kent State University;  Frank LoMonte, Student Press Law Center; Michael Bragg, Appalachian State University • Conference Room F, Lower Level

9-9:50 a.m. Thursday

Learn to Love (and Be Excellent at) Writing Headlines and Cutlines: Headlines and cutlines are the first words readers will see -- so if they stink, your stories don't matter. Learn how to write them the right way, and win fabulous prizes for writing your own for national publications. When you get back home and create compelling display text on your own, bask in the appreciation and adoration. Dan Sweeney, Florida Atlantic University • Liberty 3, Third Floor

9-9:50 a.m. Thursday

Making the Most of Opportunities: How to Stay Busy Between Media Gigs: Use your skills, expertise and background to stay busy (and happy) while searching for your full-time media job. Learn how to build and leverage a network to create jobs and opportunities that may not even currently exist. Explore ways to be your own advocate while enjoying yourself at the same time. Maggie Mullikin, Elon University • Conference Room K, Lower Level

9-9:50 a.m. Thursday

Media Ethics: How to Expect the Unexpected: Reporters on the job and under deadline often encounter ethical dilemmas that require them to make -- and live with -- split-second decisions. Young journalists are armed with significant power and discretion early in their careers. Join us to explore common dilemmas you may encounter on the job. Rebecca Taylor, Siena College • Conference Room J, Lower Level

9-9:50 a.m. Thursday

NYC Shootout Opening: Photojournalists who want to participate in the NYC Shootout should attend this assignment briefing to discuss the topic for the assignment, deadlines and file formats. Attendees will also be able to see some of the entries that received top ratings in past Shootouts. Bradley Wilson, Midwestern State University • Riverside Ballroom, Third Floor

9-9:50 a.m. Thursday

Private University Presses vs. Public University: The Good, The Bad and the Misunderstood: Every student press navigates the waters of student freedom and public image. What happens when one student newspaper is included on the censured list? In Oklahoma Baptist's case, it came back from that label to create a student-run publication within the private university forum. Discuss what that means and what comes next. Holly Easttom, Oklahoma Baptist University • Conference Room A,  Lower Level   

9-9:50 a.m. Thursday

Reboot the Right Way:  A fresh start means more than new fonts. Learn how to use newsroom configurations, market research and ad campaigns to specifically tailor content and design to your audience. Walk away knowing what you should -- and shouldn't do -- to build a successful (and lasting) brand for your news organization. Sabastian Wee, Georgia State University • Conference Room B, Lower Level

9-9:50 a.m. Thursday

The Danger of Covering News: How to Protect Your Physical and Mental Health: Increasingly younger journalists are being hired to replace experienced reporters, but are these eager rookies prepared to protect their physical and mental health while in dangerous, major metropolitan news situations? An experienced broadcast journalist badly beaten in a riot offers pointers on preparing for dangerous situations and ideas for staying physically and mentally healthy through it all. Julia Sandidge, Oregon State University • Riverside Suite, Third Floor

9-9:50 a.m. Thursday

The Revolution Will Not Be Televised: Redefining Minorities in Media  The American mainstream media often offer slanted depictions of minorities or marginalized peoples. How do alternate media combat these biases? Learn ways to reappropriate these depictions by establishing your own media platforms and ultimately rewriting the rules of media ... and learn about revolutionaries who are paving the way. Elise Peterson and  Adeshola Adigun, SaintHeron.com • Liberty 3, Third Floor

9-9:50 a.m. Thursday

Tweet Talk: How Your Social Media Skills Can Help You Get a Job: Your broadcast journalism and social media skills can help you land a job in the digital world. Learn how from a former news director who made the leap into digital after spending more than 25 years in local television. Tom Loebig, AccuWeather; Carrie Moniot, Robert Morris University  • Conference Room L, Lower Level

9-9:50 a.m. Thursday

You're Hired! Wanna know what employers are looking for from your resume? Your reels? Your college media experiences? Get the inside scoop on how to land that internship or entry-level job after college from a network news producer who works with interns and new hires. Dianne Cherry, The Ed Show, MSNBC • Conference Room I, Lower Level

10-10:50 a.m. Thursday

10 Quick Improvements to Your News Design: Outdated newspaper designs? Struggling with old type and design furniture that just doesn't fit any more? The six-time editor of The Best of Newspaper Design has some suggestions for both sooner and later. Ron Johnson, Society of News Design and Indiana University • Conference Room E, Lower Level

10-10:50 a.m. Thursday        

10 Ways to Land the Perfect Internship (and Five Things That Will Kill Your Chances): You need internships to get a job. In fact, you need internships to get better internships. But many students apply for dozens -- or even hundreds -- of internships and never get a call back. This session will reveal what omissions and mistakes applicants make that employers say keep them from rising to the top of the interview -- and hiring pile.  Steven Chappell, Northwest Missouri State University • Conference Room J, Lower Level

10-10:50 a.m. Thursday       

A Jew, a Pagan and a Mormon Walk Into a Newsroom ... In our postmodern world, newsrooms are more diverse than ever. Can people from different religious backgrounds get along? Should newspeople practice a "don't ask, don't tell" policy, or could dialogue be healthy? This panel of journalists with varied religious backgrounds will discuss their experiences of being a person of a certain faith in a newsroom that perhaps tries to pretend faith doesn't exist. Then students will work on guidelines for religious tolerance in their own newsrooms. Michael R. Finch, Lee University  • Liberty 1&2, Third Floor

10-10:50 a.m. Thursday       

But I Thought it was OK ... Copyright and Fair Use in the Internet Era:

So what is "fair use"? And how can you know what material is copyrighted and what isn't? Is "royalty free" really free? Here's what you need to know about using materials you find on the Web, without a lot of legal gobbledygook. Frank LoMonte, Student Press Law Center • Conference Room F, Lower Level                                              

10-10:50 a.m. Thursday       

CMA 101: There's a lot to know as a college media adviser, and CMA is the place to start learning. Chat with members of the board of directors about the history and benefits of CMA. They can answer questions, help you get more plugged in and introduce you to other advisers.  Kelley Callaway, College Media Association and Rice University; Rachele Kanigel, College Media Association and San Francisco University •   Room C, Lower Level

10-10:50 a.m. Thursday       

Editorial Leadership in Yearbook: It may be a challenge to lead your peers, but as an editor, it is vital that you have a vision and be able to articulate it to your staff and audience. And you have to do all this while ensuring your staff is trained, meeting its deadlines and doing quality work. Learn how to do all of that and more. Sally Renaud, Eastern Illinois University • Liberty 4, Third Floor

10-10:50 a.m. Thursday       

Freelance or Staff: Which Fits You Best? Health benefits. Colleagues. A steady paycheck. Doesn't a staff job sound nice, pleasant even? Truth is, staff positions aren't for everyone. A current freelance writer and journalist, and former staff reporter at The Juneau Empire, weighs the benefits and disadvantages of freelancing and staff writing. He'll discuss how to decide which one is right for you. Kenneth Rosen, freelance writer and journalist • Conference Room D, Lower Level

10-10:50 a.m. Thursday       

Get B-Roll: Not enough footage to intercut your stories? No cutaways? Learn a cinema technique that will help you quickly gather footage and enhance your news features through visual storytelling. Paul Glover, Henderson State University • Conference Room I, Lower Level

10-10:50 a.m. Thursday       

Healing With Photography:  Special places help connect us to precious memories, bitter and sweet. Such places can be medicine that helps salve a restless spirit or quiet refuges from a noisy world. And photography can help us connect to such memories, as the author of the Great Picture Hunt will discuss, demonstrating how college photographers can use photography as part of a healing process. David LaBelle, Kent State University • Riverside Ballroom, Third Floor

10-10:50 a.m. Thursday       

Kirk or Picard?  What kind of leader are you? Are you Lincoln or Che? Captain Kirk or Captain Picard? Compare your management style to the iconic leaders of history and popular culture -- and learn how you can avoid becoming Herbert Hoover or Michael Scott. Sabastian Wee, Georgia State University • Conference Room B, Lower Level

10-10:50 a.m. Thursday       

Making Your BEST First Impression: Whether the interview is for a story an internship or a job, in this session, attendees will learn how to get a call back, get remembered and go to the head of the class. This interactive session will give you skills that you will use right now -- not notes that you will file away and soon forget. Marcia Meskiel-Macy, MyMediaSeminars • Liberty 5, Third Floor

10-10:50 a.m. Thursday       

Network News: Two CBS News correspondents will share their vast knowledge and insight on what it's like to work in network news and discuss some of their most recent assignments. The two of them have covered just about every major news story -- domestic and internationally -- over the past two decades. Jim Axelrod and  Michelle Miller, CBS News  • New York West, Third Floor

10-10:50 a.m. Thursday

Opinion That Matters: Everyone has an opinion. So why are opinion columns so hard to write? Coming up with compelling and insightful opinion doesn't have to be agonizing. Learn from a newspaper adviser and award-winning columnist how to find issues that matter to readers, how to "people-ize" them and, most importantly, how to bring energy and life to your commentary. Brian Thompson, Flagler College • Liberty 3, Third Floor

10-10:50 a.m. Thursday       

Sex, on Deadline: Covering Campus Love, Lust and Every Kink in Between: In a growing number of columns and special features, student journalists are reporting and commenting on issues of sex, love and campus hookup culture. This session -- led by the author of Sex and the University, a book on the student sex column movement -- will share tips on sexy topics to tackle, hurdles to avoid and story formats to take. Carrie Bradshaw will make an appearance -- via PowerPoint.    Dan Reimold, Saint Joseph's University • New York East, Third Floor

10-10:50 a.m. Thursday

Shaking Off the Dust: After a decade or more of no real significant changes to your newspaper, how do you even get started on the rebranding process? The staff and adviser of The Appalachian will talk about how and why they decided to rebrand their print product, their website and their social media presence and what they've learned along the way. Allison Bennett Dyche and students, Appalachian State University • Riverside Suite, Third Floor

10-10:50 a.m. Thursday

The Science of Video: Basics and Beyond: Proficiency in videography, editing, lighting and design are key components in producing that TV look. It is important to know which tools, terminology and techniques result in quality work. This session highlights the science of video production, providing strategy that will aid you in taking your productions to the next level. Herbert Jay Dunmore, Loyola University Maryland • Conference Room H, Lower Level

10-10:50 a.m. Thursday

Tweeting, Posting and Sharing, OH MY! This hands-on session will show you how to hold on to your most valuable asset -- your reputation. You will learn how to not only preserve your online reputation from here on out, but also how to clean up the bad stuff that may already be out there. Toni Albertson, Mt. San Antonio College • Conference Room K, Lower Level

10-10:50 a.m. Thursday

Writing for a Big Web Audience: At NBC.com, this speaker writes for a big web audience -- and every day he tries to make it bigger. He also has built traffic at places like Gawker and Consumer Reports. Learn how his techniques can work for your media organization. Ben Popken, NBC.com • Conference Room L, Lower Level

10-10:50 a.m. Thursday      

Yearbook Themes: Getting It All in Under 200 Pages: Every yearbook staff dreads developing and maintaining a theme while covering all university events in less than 200 pages. This session looks at various themes, theme development, telling the human story and cramming as much as one can on each spread without visually assaulting the reader. Holly Easttom, Oklahoma Baptist University • Conference Room A, Lower Level 

11 a.m.-12 p.m. Thursday

Scott Pelley Keynote

12:30-1:20 p.m. Thursday     

A New Kind of Fourth Estate: Launching a Successful Student Media Startup: The campus newspaper and a prominent student-news site at George Mason University merged this past fall to form a single, robust, multiplatform media outlet. The full-blown digital-print convergence, known as Fourth Estate, has earned national attention, including a spotlight in The New York Times. What are the secrets behind the success so far? Get tips on how editors are reinventing their staff structure, production routines, content distribution, reader engagement and larger editorial mission. Frank Muraca and Hau Chu, George Mason University • Liberty 1&2, Third Floor

12:30-1:20 p.m. Thursday

Broadcast News Basics in the Digital Age: 10 Essential Tips for Students and Teachers: Learn web-based audio and video techniques to help make your newscast stand out in the crowded information world.  A broadcast news professor and CBS Radio News Network writer will share valuable tips for broadcast news in the digital era. Tom Moore, CUNY York College • Conference Room H, Lower Level

12:30-1:20 p.m. Thursday     

De"zine" Careers Explained         

Magazine designers and a publishing HR rep give you the lowdown on how to get those design internships and first jobs in magazine art departments, big and small. Leah Bailey, Society of Publication Designers; Dennis Huynh, Entertainment Weekly; Jennifer Sharpe, Time Inc.; Jamie Hara Feld, InStyle • Conference Room K, Lower Level

12:30-1:20 p.m. Thursday

Design to Scare Your Boss: One of the highlights of the SND convention last year was the speaker's session: "If You're Not Scaring Your Boss, You're Not Trying Hard Enough." Hear his tips for being bold -- and still getting your frightened boss to approve your design! Tim Frank, Gannett Design Studio  • Conference Room E, Lower Level

12:30-1:20 p.m. Thursday

Diversity Roundtable: Students only. Moderators of various races/ethnic origins will have two minutes each (time them!) to suggest topics. (Are minority journalists always given "minority" stories? Is the newsroom environment welcoming to all?) Then jump in to discuss whatever you feel is most important. Trey Williams, Northwest Missouri State University; Aaron J. Montes, University of Texas at El Paso; Meagan Williams,  Southern University and A&M College; Francesca Stokes, Bloomsburg University • Liberty 3, Third Floor

12:30-1:20 p.m. Thursday     

Double Session: Advising 101 -- Introduction to Advising: New to the job of advising? Allow veteran advisers to share what it takes to survive those first years. Topics include the role of the adviser and its challenges; hands on/hands off including prior review; and the basics of advising a newsroom. Sally Renaud, Eastern Illinois University; Chris Evans, University of Vermont; Bonnie Thrasher, Arkansas State University • Conference Room C, Lower Level

12:30-1:20 p.m. Thursday     

From Nowhere to Narrative is Easy as ABCE: A few simple tips -- ABCE (action, background, climax and end) -- can turn your slideshow from a set of pictures to a real narrative story. Learn to look for some basic shots in still and video photography and how to weave them together into a story. Jack Zibluk, Southeast Missouri State University • Riverside Ballroom, Third Floor

12:30-1:20 p.m. Thursday     

Going Beyond J School to Build a Campus Magazine: How can you put together a new magazine using sources beyond your own journalism department? Learn how the University of Alabama Honors College has done so, building Mosaic magazine with writers, photographers, designers and editors from many fields of study. Mark Mayfield and students, University of Alabama • Liberty 5, Third Floor

12:30-1:20 p.m. Thursday     

Introduction to Non-Linear Video Editing: Does it seem as though everyone was born knowing how to edit video?  If you feel lost when the discussion turns to Final Cut Pro or how to "cut" up a video for YouTube, fear no more. A professional editor and former college media producer will guide you through the basics, including discussion of multiple platforms, how to get started and how skills in video editing can get you a job. Gaby Román, Meltzer Media Productions • Conference Room I, Lower Level

12:30-1:20 p.m. Thursday     

Lit Mag Roundtable: Want to transform your literary magazine into the most treasured publication on campus? Join a roundtable discussion on everything from content and design to digital publications facilitated by Oregon State University, home of Prism Art and Literary Magazine.  Bring samples of your publications to discuss. Julia Sandidge, Oregon State University • Conference Room A, Lower Level  

12:30-1:20 p.m. Thursday     

Network and Freelance Your Way to Work: Refining your resume can only take you so far. Learn and put into practice tools for building your personal and professional networks to take you from unemployed to steady work, and keep you there. Allegra Oxborough, Design & Acquisition •Conference Room D, Lower Level

12:30-1:20 p.m. Thursday     

Old vs. New News: News is ever-changing, and so is its mode of presentation. The Boston Marathon Timeline (http://vimeo.com/65430449) video combined writing, broadcast and crowdsourcing, reached more than 75,000 views in two weeks and was a Vimeo staff pick ... and it was created by a student. We'll discuss how and why the video was made and the reactions to it. Emily Tolan, Cutters Studios • Riverside Suite, Third Floor

12:30-1:20 p.m. Thursday     

Open Mic Night for Advisers: The executive director of the SPLC takes on all comers and questions from advisers in a student-free environment. Get good, plain legal advice for your student publications.  Frank LoMonte, Student Press Law Center • Conference Room C, Lower Level

12:30-1:20 p.m. Thursday     

So You Want to Cover Big-Time Sports: Want to cover the Olympics, the Final Four and the World Cup? Find out what the Associated Press will be looking for when you apply. The speaker oversees AP sports, entertainment and digital news. Lou Ferrara, Associated Press • New York West, Third Floor

12:30-1:20 p.m. Thursday     

The Short Story: A quality picture pulls a viewer into a publication, but it's the caption that helps them answer the questions raised by the photo. Come walk through how to write storytelling captions with impact, and discuss why the cutline is the responsibility of the photojournalist, what should be included and why photojournalists should care. Kevin Kleine, Berry College • Conference Room J, Lower Level

12:30-1:20 p.m. Thursday

Think Like a Web Producer:  At the "Thunderdome," web producers evaluate how stories should be presented at Digital First Media websites around the country. And it's not just wire editing. They generate original content to enhance the stories. Attend if you'd like a job like that someday or would like better content on your college media site. Matt Walks, Digital First Media • New York East, Third Floor

12:30-1:20 p.m. Thursday     

What You Must Know About the Business of Media: Paywalls, e-commerce, monetization. Take it from a recent president of the national Associated Press Media Editors: Understanding the business may be critical for your success. The speaker, a former reporter who now is executive editor at Asbury Park Press and oversees a Gannett design hub, will give you a rundown of the dollars and cents and take your business and career questions.Hollis Towns, Asbury Park Press • Conference Room L, Lower Level

12:30-1:20 p.m. Thursday     

Whose Personality Is It Anyway? Do Yearbook Themes Reflect the Editors' Style and Agendas or Trends? With the daunting task of producing an historical record, an interesting read and an exciting memory book, yearbook editors often draw upon their personalities, experiences, goals and agendas plus current trends to complete their books. Let's discuss how these individual personality types affect the staff, the theme and the book itself. Polly Walter, University of Central Arkansas       • Liberty 4, Third Floor

12:30-1:20 p.m. Thursday     

Why Is The Paper Always Talking About Race? You cover racial matters, and you're accused of making it sound like a small group of bigots control the campus. You ignore them, and you're accused of sweeping the truth under the rug. Let's discuss fair, honest and courageous coverage and how to keep your staff from feeling overwhelmed by the vitriol surrounding these issues. Patricia Thompson and Adam Ganucheau, University of Mississippi; Mazie Bryant, University of Alabama • Conference Room F, Lower Level

12:30-1:30 p.m. Thursday

Academic Research Panel: Hear from fellow advisers who have conducted scholarship on college media. These top research papers are the result of a peer-reviewed selection process, designed to showcase some of the excellent research being done on college media issues today.             Lisa Lyon Payne, Virginia Wesleyan College • Conference Room B, Lower Level

1:30-2:20 p.m. Thursday       

A Documentary Storytelling Skillset: Learn how a strong multimedia documentary skillset translates into work across several fields, including academia, nonprofits and advertising. The speaker, a multimedia producer and strategist, will explain the role of storytelling in her work, including experiences as a writer, radio news intern and production intern with StoryCorps. Allegra Oxborough, Design & Acquisition • Conference Room D, Lower Level

1:30-2:20 p.m. Thursday                   

Audience Engagement: A Sustainable Business Model: We know what matters is getting and holding people's attention, getting them to consume our content, to know us, like us and come back to read our stuff again and again. But until recently, we haven't had the ability to quantify audience attention. Discuss the metrics, tools and approaches to thinking about and using audience engagement as a way to build and monetize a loyal audience.  David van Dokkum, Chartbeat • Conference Room L, Lower Level

1:30-2:20 p.m. Thursday                   

Covering Tragedy With Sympathetic Objectivity: Each death in a community contains a story that needs to be told. Review and discuss examples from campus and professional newspapers to show how reporters can tell stories of faith shining through adversity. See how with every obit or accident, a newspaper staff learns something new. You'll also discuss a strategy that helps reporters and editors do their job well without unduly alarming the community. Deborah Huff, Liberty University • Conference Room A, Lower Level   

1:30-2:20 p.m. Thursday

Death on Campus: A Primer for Ethical and Responsive Coverage: Every news staff will, at some point, face covering a death on campus. If you're not ready, your coverage will seem weak, insensitive or simply irrelevant. Learn to plan how deaths are covered, from what records to seek and how to interview friends and family members to ways to deal with criticism. The emphasis will be on fair and ethical coverage, while keeping an eye out for public safety issues that might need investigating. Max McCoy, Emporia State University • Liberty 5, Third Floor

1:30-2:20 p.m. Thursday

Design By Inspiration: There's no need to reinvent the wheel -- but you shouldn't flat out steal it, either. Learn to adapt the design you see working in professional media.  Find the best of what's out there to create the best work for your campus. Randy Stano, Ivana Cruz and Raquel Zaldivar, University of Miami • Conference Room E, Lower Level

1:30-2:20 p.m. Thursday

FBI Strategies for Interviewing: Learn the tools the FBI has been using for years to get useful information out of interview subjects. This session shows you how to use simple psychological strategies to set people at ease and make them more likely to tell you what you want to know, without pliers or a car battery! These ethical, easy-to-learn tools are perfect for anyone who gets anxious before a big interview, needs an interviewing refresher or wants a psychological advantage. Holly Johnson, Mercer County Community College • Conference Room K, Lower Level

1:30-2:20 p.m. Thursday

FERPA and Violent Crimes on Campus: When reporters at Oklahoma State's The Daily O'Collegian were tipped about nearly a dozen sexual assaults against new fraternity members, they learned university officials had never contacted local police because they thought it would violate FERPA, the Federal Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. Let's discuss FERPA and how universities often get it wrong. We'll also talk about the Clery Act, which requires universities to collect and disclose information about crimes on and near campus. Frank LoMonte, Student Press Law Center • Conference Room F, Lower Level

1:30-2:20 p.m. Thursday

How I Got Maximum Skills in Student Media (and a Great Job After Graduation): The speaker couldn't get his first-choice job at least twice on his college paper. But he graduated in May 2013 and went straight to Digital First Media's "Thunderdome" in New York. he reason: He seized every opportunity to learn new skills. Learn how and why you should do so, too. Matt Walks, Digital First Media •  New York East, Third Floor

1:30-2:20 p.m. Thursday

Journalists are Superheroes: Superman and Spiderman chose to change the world with their superpowers -- and not just their physical ones. Famously seeking "truth, justice and the American way," these superheroes sought careers in journalism. Join us to discuss why journalism appealed to these heroes, the ethical breaches they committed and how today's journalists can also be super. Kelley Callaway, Rice University • Room B, Lower Level

1:30-2:20 p.m. Thursday

Multimedia Storytelling: The digital age gives filmmakers, documentary photographers and photojournalists extraordinary, unprecedented ways to tell stories. With this new ability, you can also exercise a greater level of authorship. Learn how to disseminate your work to create an impact on the subject, issue and possibly society. See how some of the top photojournalists have redefined their storytelling capabilities to include audio reporting and an eye towards publication in multiple media.  Brian Storm, MediaStorm • New York West, Third Floor

1:30-2:20 p.m. Thursday

Producing Morning Radio: Want to know what it takes to produce an energetic morning radio show in one of the largest media markets in the world? Learn the techniques the pros use daily -- and then take them back to your campus station to create a professional show that informs and entertains your community and can land you a job in the industry. Carla Marie, Elvis Duran and the Morning Show • Conference Room H, Lower Level

1:30-2:20 p.m. Thursday

The Religion Beat: Your Ticket to Feature Fare Editors (and Readers) Will Love: Breaking news! The religion beat is back! Most folks doing the hiring in America's newsrooms say a specialty is critical. Why not specialize in religion? Learn how this beat is out of this world and might open more doors than you might think. Joe Starrs, The Institute on Political Journalism • Liberty 1&2, Third Floor

1:30-2:20 p.m. Thursday

What Are All of Those Buttons on My Camera? Pocket cameras and smartphones are increasingly used to capture news and other video footage. What happens when your job requires the use of professional cameras with advanced features? Are you prepared? Learn about features on professional video production equipment and best practices for their use. Herbert Jay Dunmore, Loyola University Maryland • Riverside Ballroom, Third Floor

1:30-2:20 p.m. Thursday                   

Yearbook Roundtable: Join the adviser of the Talisman for a discussion on all things yearbook  -- from caption writing to managing a staff and everything in between -- during this session. Bring your questions and concerns, and get advice from other yearbook editors and advisers from around the country.  Charlotte Turtle, Western Kentucky University         • Liberty 4, Third Floor

1:30-2:30 p.m. Thursday

Writing with Voice in Narrative and Other Features: We talk about writing with authority, writing with voice and writing narrative. It boils down to accepting that YOU are the storyteller. Your observations may belong in the story. Most direct quotes may not. Learn from some big-name examples and the more modest experiences of a speaker who has gotten away with writing with voice at The Associated Press and The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. David Simpson, Georgia Southern University  • Conference Room J, Lower Level

1:30-3:20 p.m. Thursday

Double Session: Final Cut Pro X Tutorial

Whether you love it, hate it or don't know much about it, Apple's Final Cut Pro X is here to stay. The platform's amazing features allow you to maintain creativity but speed up the process. A professional editor and FCPX educator will demonstrate tips and tricks to help first-time or relatively new users and users transitioning from FCP 7 or Adobe Premiere. We'll have plenty of time to get into specifics and answer questions.  Gaby Román, Meltzer Media Productions • Conference Room I, Lower Level

2:30-3:20 p.m. Thursday       

Advertising and Sales Roundtable: How do you motivate your sales staff? Create promotional campaigns to draw in new advertisers? Replace disappearing (if not already gone) national revenue? How important are metrics and readerships? Join sales managers, account execs, advisers and others looking to share advertising and revenue success stories (or vent among peers) in this open discussion. Alexandria Paulinho, Bloomsburg University • Conference Room A,  Lower Level  

2:30-3:20 p.m. Thursday       

But I Don't Want To Be A Journalist: So you work for student media, and the biggest lesson you learned is you don't actually want to go into media. How do you translate what you've learned into a real-world job? This session will break down the skills you are acquiring now and help you apply them to a resume. (You will need a pen or pencil.) Adrianne Henderson, Roger Williams University • Liberty 3, Third Floor

2:30-3:20 p.m. Thursday       

Chicken Salad: The copy is late, most of the photos are weak, and your production deadline is in 36 hours. But that doesn't stop the EIC from hovering over you, asking, "Can't you add a pull-quote or a chart or something?" How are you supposed to whip up award-winning designs under these conditions? A professional designer will show you how -- by revamping actual college newspapers, from front pages to feature spreads. In minutes, not hours. Note: This presentation features educational nudity and profanity. Michael Koretzky, SPJ national board member • New York West, Third Floor

2:30-3:20 p.m. Thursday    

Covering Campus Disciplinary Systems: Federal law requires campuses to disclose statistics about who's getting disciplined for what, but those reports are wildly unreliable and almost never audited. The SPLC is putting together a nationwide project to spotlight the inadequacy of disclosure of campus disciplinary statistics. Let's talk about how you can be part of it. Frank LoMonte and Casey McDermott, Student Press Law Center • Conference Room F, Lower Level

2:30-3:20 p.m. Thursday

Design Doctor: Bring your yearbook pages (in print or downloaded image files), and the design doctor will shoot you some improvements -- from content to visuals, from typography to white space. Ron Johnson, Society of News Design and Indiana University • Liberty 4, Third Floor

2:30-3:20 p.m. Thursday

Fast Five: Great Ideas for Advising and Teaching in No More Than Five Minutes: Get a new idea for teaching or advising every five minutes. At least one will rejuvenate a class, jumpstart a program or solve that nagging "what will I do with them today?" problem. No rambling, we promise. Cowbells will be provided.Hillary Warren, Otterbein University; David Swartzlander, Doane College • Conference Room C, Lower Level

2:30-3:20 p.m. Thursday       

Geeking on Google Analytics: Go beyond page views and how people get to your site. We'll venture in-depth with Google Analytics, and you'll discover how to better understand the information at your fingertips. Brad Arendt, Boise State University • Riverside Suite, Third Floor

2:30-3:20 p.m. Thursday

Sports Controversies on Campus: Your star football player's fake, online relationship goes public. A coach has been found sexually abusive to his/her players. Learn from two sports pros and an experienced adviser how to uncover information when the athletic department goes underground and won't talk. Discuss how best to cover sports controversies of all kinds on your campus. Jon Wertheim, Sports Illustrated; Gary Metzker, California State University, Long Beach; John Branch, The New York Times • New York East, Third Floor

2:30-3:20 p.m. Thursday

Step Away From the Mouse: Every great design started on a whiskey-stained napkin at a bar in the Lower East Side. It's time to go back to the basics and find how to put these principles into every day designing. Join this young design professional to transform garbage into cutting-edge pieces for your portfolio. Bring your favorite pen, and I'll bring the napkins -- we're totally gonna meet this deadline! Christopher Hardgrove, Niche Media Productions • Conference Room E, Lower Level

2:30-3:20 p.m. Thursday

Tough Interview? You Can Do It! Does your stomach ache at the thought of interviewing the college spokeswoman who always criticizes you? Or the campus police chief who doesn't welcome your analysis of crime statistics? Or the student who just lost a loved one to combat or a tornado? Learn how to do these interviews while respecting your subjects -- and yourself. David Simpson, Georgia Southern University • Conference Room J, Lower Level

2:30-3:20 p.m. Thursday

Turning "Traffic" Into Data-Driven, Real-Time Journalism: This session will explain how the latest advancements in online analytics move data out of back-office reports and into the hands of people who can take action on them -- writers and editors. We'll discuss the different kinds of information you should be paying attention to (e.g., social data, traffic sources, audience return rate, engagement metrics) and how others in the industry are doing so too.  David van Dokkum, Chartbeat • Conference Room L, Lower Level

2:30-3:20 p.m. Thursday       

Using Improv Comedy to Make Your Staff a Better Team: Building a functional, cohesive team is difficult, especially under the pressure of deadlines. But you can have fun while becoming a strong team. Learn easy and fun improvisational comedy games and techniques that you can incorporate into training and staff meetings, led by a journalist who's also a professional improviser. Andy Dehnart, Stetson University  • Conference Room K, Lower Level

2:30-3:20 p.m. Thursday       

Why College Editors Get Jobs: You're an editor because you love it, but it's a smart career move for any field. Learn how to make the most of your time and to use that experience to make your case to a prospective employer. From cover letters and resumes to recommendations and job interviews, college editors are ahead of the game. When jobs are scarce, editors get the jobs. Our panel will show you how best to brand yourself using your time as an editor. Mary Bernath Gabrielle Vielhauer, and Keara Hozella, Bloomsburg University • Conference Room B, Lower Level

2:30-3:20 p.m. Thursday

Working Full Time on the Religion Beat: The online magazine A Journey Through NYC Religions continues to garner admiration for its in-depth, street-by-street coverage. Two staffers will share their personal journey along with the work they do daily. They'll discuss their philosophy of sympathetic objectivity; journey-style street reporting; lessons from online journalism; the opportunities of reporting at times of social disruption; journalism for the democratic good; and post-secular journalism. Melissa Kimiadi and Christopher Smith, nycreligion.info • Conference Room D, Lower Level

2:30-3:20 p.m. Thursday

Yes, You Should Cover Popular Culture and the Arts! If student editors are interested in covering the lives of students, that means they will need to cover news related to the arts and popular culture. From student bands to the world of video games, students are making popular art and consuming it. Reviews are one thing. Finding the news in the popular culture scene is something else. Terry Mattingly, Scripps-Howard and Washington Journalism Center • Liberty 1&2, Third Floor

2:30-3:30 p.m. Thursday

Dealing With Difficult Advertisers: Despite your best efforts, sometimes you just can't make an advertiser happy. Sometimes clients complain to score a discount, while other times it's as if they are berating you for sport. If a minority of your advertisers drain the majority of your time and mental energy, is it worth holding onto them? Vent about your worst clients -- and brainstorm possible solutions -- in this interactive session led by a publisher who launched a newsstand magazine in 2011 that has doubled advertising revenue with each issue.  Laura Ward, Adirondack Weddings, SUNY Plattsburgh • Liberty 5, Third Floor

2:30-4:20 p.m. Thursday

Double Session: Royalties and Licensing for Streaming Radio: Let's clear up the confusion about the requirements of streaming your station's signal on the net. Learn copyright 101 for webcasting and specific issues that relate to SoundExchange royalties, forms and payments for college radio webcasters. And of course there'll be time for Q&A. Whether you have a terrestrial station or a web-only operation, this is a must-attend session for any college radio station streaming their signal on the web. Travis Ploeger, SoundExchange • Conference Room H, Lower Level

3:30-4:20 p.m. Thursday

Advising 102 -- Managing Students and Money: Advising is more than just sharing your journalism skills. The hardest part is managing students and money. These veteran advisers will address leadership, recruiting and training of millenials and the business aspect of advising student media. Sally Renaud, Eastern Illinois University; Chris Evans, University of Vermont • Conference Room C, Lower Level

3:30-4:20 p.m. Thursday       

Boom Goes the Dynamite: Learning from On-Air Disasters: Anyone who has been behind a mic or in front of a camera in a live broadcast has had at least one moment they wish they could take back, and if you haven't had that moment yet, you will. Whether you've had cottonmouth and flop sweat, a raging case of the giggles or the world caught you cursing into a live mic, the key is to learn from the mistakes you (and others) make to become a polished on-air presence. Jim Hayes, Vanderbilt University and College Media Association • Conference Room I, Lower Level

3:30-4:20 p.m. Thursday

Creating a Marketing Team for Student Media: Let's renovate the way we generate revenue. Does it only come through print ads, online ads or underwriting? And let's renovate the way we operate. Could student media consist of more than just editorial, broadcast, and advertising teams? And create opportunities for students to gain experience in administration, marketing, design, sales and more? Hear what's been working at Kennesaw State, and walk away with ideas of your own! Amie Mowrey, Kennesaw State University • Liberty 1&2, Third Floor

3:30-4:20 p.m. Thursday

Creative Thinking: Go From No Idea to Great Ideas: It's a terrifying feeling: You're on deadline, you need an idea for a story or design and you're staring at a blank screen. But creativity shouldn't be a nightmare or a mystery. There are easy ways to come up with original concepts that will make your work stand out. Learn how to develop creative solutions and be more innovative from a visual journalist whose work appears in The New York Times, The Washington Post and Businessweek. Sean Kelly, Creativity Seminar and Sean Kelly Studio • New York East, Third Floor

3:30-4:20 p.m. Thursday

Drones, Wearable Tech and Who Knows What Else: The folks at the "Thunderdome" are actually playing with (OK, studying) drones, wearable tech and anything else that might affect how we gather or share news. Hear some actual research and get excited about the very near future. Tom Meaghe and Patrick Hogan, Digital First Media •  New York West, Third Floor

3:30-4:20 p.m. Thursday

Follow Your Interests to Find Your Niche: Learn how following your personal interests can lead to projects and jobs that make you and your audience happy. The speakers -- a graphics editor and a freelance photographer -- have been working together since middle school. Since moving to New York, they pursued their very different interests (data and running), and those paths have led to dream jobs and dream clients. Get tips on how to find your road.  Larry Buchanan, The New York Times; Zach Hetrick, Zach Hetrick Photography • Conference Room E, Lower Level

3:30-4:20 p.m. Thursday

How the Best Yearbooks Do It: What is in or out with the look and tone of college yearbooks? We'll look at sample spreads from strong books to see what they've covered and how. We'll also consider how they handle day-to-day and special occasion design, using all sections of the book. Randy Stano, Katherine Lee and Holly Bensur, University of Miami • Liberty 4

3:30-4:20 p.m. Thursday       

How to Pitch Your Way Into Magazines and More: How do you find places to publish your writing? How do you craft effective pitches that will get an editor's attention? How do you find success as a freelancer? A journalist, TV critic and writer who's written for Buzzfeed, Playboy, NPR, The New York Times and The Daily Beast, among other publications, will give you secrets to making your way as a writer. Andy Dehnart, Stetson University • Conference Room K,  Lower Level   

3:30-4:20 p.m. Thursday

Niche Publications on Campus: a Shared Editorial-Advertorial Mission? When it comes to newspapers, we all know it'' never OK to promise editorial coverage to an advertising client in order to get their business. But do those rules apply to special niche sections on food or fashion? Is it ever ethical to cover your advertisers simply because they advertise -- or at all? We'll take a look at all sides of the issue in this interactive session led by a professor of journalism ethics who also publishes a niche magazine. Laura Ward, Adirondack Weddings, SUNY Plattsburgh • Liberty 5, Third Floor

3:30-4:20 p.m. Thursday

One Way or Another: Solving Digital Imaging Issues: Ever had a photo submitted that is too low in resolution to print? Do you need the image background removed NOW? Learn additional photo editing skills with onOne Software's Perfect Photo Suite. This session will show techniques using Perfect BW, Perfect Mask, Perfect Resize and Perfect Effects. Polly Walter, University of Central Arkansas • Riverside Ballroom, Third Floor

3:30-4:20 p.m. Thursday       

Reignite Your Creativity: Personal creative projects can combat burnout and encourage creativity in both student journalists and student-media advisers. See how documentary projects have helped one academic deal with personal and professional challenges. The speaker will also showcase other creative works and show you how projects like these could help you grow. Clark Baker, Baylor University • Conference Room A, Lower Level   

3:30-4:20 p.m. Thursday

Rock On ... line! How to Become a Music Journalist: So you want to be a rock-and-roll reporter? It takes a lot more than just blood, sweat, tears and good writing skills. This session will show you how to become a music journalist with a loyal readership before you even hit the streets. Toni Albertson, Mt. San Antonio College • Conference Room D, Lower Level

3:30-4:20 p.m. Thursday       

Show Me the $$$: Raising Cash to Pay for Stuff (Like Trips to CMA): You're selling ads, but after printing costs, there's just not much money left. Sound familiar? Learn and share fun and easy ways to raise money by organizing events and coordinating sales so you can purchase those much-needed supplies, host a staff retreat or get to the next CMA conference! Lindsey Wotanis, Ann Williams and Lindsey Matylewicz, Marywood University • Conference Room B, Lower Level

3:30-4:20 p.m. Thursday

Surviving a World of Buyouts, Mergers, Bankruptcies, Acquisitions, Spinoffs and Layoffs: Pursuing a career in the media today  means entering a world of drastic change. Success will be measured not by awards or editorships but by one's ability to adapt to transformation and to survive the sometimes-cutthroat world of journalism. Join a former college journalist whose career did not go exactly as planned, but who has found new ways to learn, adapt and even thrive. See how his lessons can put you a step ahead. Chris Gillon, Billtrust • Conference Room J, Lower Level

3:30-4:20 p.m. Thursday

Tackling the Sci-Tech Beat: Science and technology are two of the richest areas for coverage in the Digital Age, but how do you keep up with the latest innovations and give readers more than just study summaries and gadget reviews?  A top editor from Scientific American offers tips and ideas for those on the sci-tech beat. Michael Moyer, Scientific American • Conference Room L, Lower Level

3:30-4:20 p.m. Thursday       

This is PhotoJeopardy!  PhotoJeopardy is a dangerously entertaining way to learn about everything from MIL point-and-shoot cameras to Flip, on-the-fly video productions. Learn and win fabulous prizes! Final Jeopardy is like double jeopardy; keep your hyperfocal distance, my friends. Rich Riski and Boneita Smith, Peninsula College • Riverside Suite, Third Floor

4-5:20 p.m. Thursday

Advisory Council Meeting By invitation only. CMA's Advisory Council will discuss future directions for the organization. Rachele Kanigel, College Media Association • Central Park West, Second Floor

5:30-7 p.m. Thursday

Adviser Reception: If you're new to CMA, join us to make some friends over light food and drink. If you're a vet, you know this is the perfect spot to begin your evening's activities. Advisers, pro speakers and sponsors are all welcome to join us for the event, sponsored by TownNews. College Media Association and TownNews • Lenox Ballroom, Second Floor

Review schedules for Wednesday, Friday and Saturday.

(Photo by magurka from stock.xchng.)