Today's schedule is subject to change. Check the NYC14 app (available in late February) for updated details.

8-9 a.m. Saturday

PHIL14 and NYC15 Planning Meeting: Members of the CMA Convention Programming Committee will meet to discuss ideas, deadlines and numbers for CMA's NYC15 and the 2014 Fall National College Media Convention in Philadelphia. Interested in brainstorming or getting involved? Join us to work! Lori Brooks, College Media Association

9-9:50 a.m. Saturday 

Advertising and the Art of Communication: Advertising legend Bill Bernbach said, "You won't be interesting unless you say things imaginatively, originally, freshly." See how advertising can be both artful and effective with an advertising pro who has worked on a variety of accounts, including Volvo, Charles Schwab and Napa Auto Parts.           Jennifer Perry, Publicis Kaplan Thale • Conference Room K, Lower Level

9-9:50 a.m. Saturday 

Be an Aberration: We're young journalists, sick of being told to become lawyers and attorneys. A year ago we created the student-run, feminist media empire, Aberrance Quarterly (AQ). Rated  No. 2 on a Huffington Post  Best Five Things That Happened in 2013 blogpost, AQ is only beginning. Hear us, join us and become a chic feminist. Alexa Pence, duPont Manual High School; Julian Wright, Columbia University; Steve Squall, freelance photographer; Ashley Burkett, University of Louisville • Liberty 5, Third Floor

9-9:50 a.m. Saturday 

Follow the Ball: Do you ever feel like your book covers the same old same topics year after year? Take advice from the coach and follow the ball. Tell a homecoming football game from the ball's perspective or the party from the perspective of the keg. Come to this session to learn new ways to cover your campus and how to spin the stories that run every year. Charlotte Turtle, Western Kentucky University • Liberty 4, Third Floor

9-9:50 a.m. Saturday 

Getting Published in CMR: Want to publish research or other articles about college media? Want to get more involved in CMA through participation in College Media Review? Then come to this session to chat with the CMR editor. Bob Bergland, Missouri Western State University •     Conference Room A,  Lower Level   

9-9:50 a.m. Saturday 

Go Big or Go Home: An Inside Guide to Crafting Long-Form, Human Stories: Learn a step-by-step guide for long-form journalism, including: What makes an in-depth story; the difference between news stories, documentaries and features; characters' role in great stories; the etiquette of pitching and a guide to pitching human interest stories; the best ways to deal with editors and subjects; deadlines; enhancing stories with photography; and keeping things professional.    Emon Hassan and Rebecca White, Narratively • New York West, Third Floor

9-9:50 a.m. Saturday 

How Do You Teach Writing? How do you teach your students to write like journalists when their favorite adjective is "cool," they don't read newspapers, they seem to love the "college-essay" format and/or they donÕt know what news is anyway? Get advising tips and lesson plans that will push students to identify the news, excise opinion, grip the reader and never let go. This session is intended for advisers, but editors looking to improve their reporters' writing are welcome. Chris Evans, University of Vermont • Conference Room C, Lower Level

9-9:50 a.m. Saturday 

How to Be a Watchdog: Using Public Records Requests to do Great Stories: Was the professor who quit teaching in the middle of the semester fired for trying to date his student? Did the board hide negative comments about the president from the public? Did the university discipline four of the starters on the basketball team who were arrested? Learn how to use public records to hold your university accountable.

Frank LoMonte, Student Press Law Center; Susan Zake, Kent State University • Conference Room F, Lower Level

9-9:50 a.m. Saturday 

Keys to Blogging and Freelancing as a Career:  Sometimes you don't feel like working for anyone. This speaker says there's nothing wrong with that. Let's talk about how to start your own blog and tap into the freelance world so you can dictate your career on your terms and your time.    Scooby Axson, SI.com • Conference Room J, Lower Level

9-9:50 a.m. Saturday 

Land an Internship or Job With a Cutting-Edge Web E-Portfolio: A new-media wonk and experienced adviser will showcase examples of solid media portfolios and provide suggestions on what you'll need in yours. He'll also walk you through the pros and cons of various website options. Come ready to take notes. Markus Pfeiffer, Regent University • Liberty 1&2, Third Floor

9-9:50 a.m. Saturday

Living the (Pipe) Dream:  Landing a gig at Entertainment Weekly seemed like a pipe dream a few years ago. Fast forward through all the internships, nos and the invention of the iPad, and that dream is now a reality. Hear how an Oklahoman made the move from Tulsa to NYC. We'll talk about how to make it in the magazine industry fresh out of college, and then have a Q&A session for all your burning questions. Seriously. Ask her anything! Breia Brissey, Entertainment Weekly • Conference Room D, Lower Level

 9-9:50 a.m. Saturday 

Making The Most Out Of Your Internship: In such a competitive field, an internship is no longer optional -- it's essential. But once you've landed your internship, how can you make it about more than just grabbing coffee and schlepping samples? Get real-world advice on maximizing your time as an intern, including how to work with and learn from editors and how to score a byline, too. Annie Tomlin, freelance editor 

9-9:50 a.m. Saturday 

Student Radio Critiques: You've listened, your adviser has listened, your friends have listened ... even your Aunt Sue tuned in once. But you still want an unbiased opinion on how you can make your radio show better.  Bring your aircheck on a flash drive in MP3 format and have a New York radio professional give you a quick and constructive critique. Bartel, WKTU 103.5 FM • Conference Room H, Lower Level

9-9:50 a.m. Saturday 

Student Television Critiques: Your TV show has been seen by your adviser or professor, your friends and even your mom. But you still want an unbiased opinion on what you're doing well and what you can do better. Bring your show on a flash drive in QuickTime format and have a former television producer turned veteran media adviser give you a quick and constructive critique. Jim Hayes, Vanderbilt University and College Media Association • Conference Room I, Lower Level

9-9:50 a.m. Saturday

The C Word (Critiques): Whether you advise print or online, daily or weekly, you've always got to be ready with feedback for your students. But how? Learn the best ways to reach and connect with students so they're eager to hear your notes instead of dreading your red pen. Jessica Clary, SCAD Atlanta • Conference Room L, Lower Level

9-9:50 a.m. Saturday

The Fruit That Ate Itself: You have a great media outlet but for some reason, a couple of your best staffers start to bash it -- to the public! Discuss strategies for dealing with staff members who air the station's or paper's dirty laundry through the very medium that employs them.  Paul Glover and Michael Ray Taylor, Henderson State University; Kelley Callaway, Rice University • Conference Room B, Lower Level

9-9:50 a.m. Saturday 

The Good, the Bad and the Really, Really Ugly: Color can make or break a story package, and understanding how to use color effectively is more complicated than you might think. A brief explanation of how colors have both positive and negative meanings will lead to discussion, analysis and examples. Avoid Skittles vomit and discover the power of effective color. Linda S. Puntney, Herff Jones • Conference Room E, Lower Level

9-9:50 a.m. Saturday 

Things We Swear By, Gen J Edition: Generation J is you: the generation of journalists getting ready to set the world on fire. It's also a Society of Professional Journalists community, a home for all journalists in their first 10 years of "real life." Learn from two Gen J'ers about the tools you have and how to use them, digital branding, how to keep your identities professional (and fun) and what things you need to do to get hired in this job climate. Victoria Reitano, Telepictures; Andrew Seaman, Thompson Reuters • New York West, Third Floor

10-10:50 a.m.  Saturday        

10 On-The-Job Social Media Commandments: Almost everyone uses Instagram and Twitter, but *how* you use social media can make all the difference in your career. This session will explore how to use social media to boost your chances of success -- along with highlighting common mistakes many people make. Annie Tomlin, freelance editor • Riverside Suite, Third Floor

10-10:50 a.m. Saturday        

50 Sites For Journalists: A rapid-fire list of 50 web tools and apps for journalists: From Doodle to Storyful, you'll find tools to help share and discover content, find sources and create interactive stories plus spend a few minutes wasting time with some good old-fashioned fun on the interwebs. Andrew Seaman, Thompson Reuters; Victoria Reitano, Telepictures • New York West, Third Floor

10-10:50 a.m.  Saturday        

Are You Ready for the Backlash? Some negative feedback about your student press work is expected, but backlash from fellow students can be tougher to accept and involves higher stakes. Learn how to navigate this rough terrain from an editor-in-chief and adviser who have trod it -- through a campus-diversity issue that became embroiled in controversy. Discuss if this kind of reaction might be prevented and whether such heated response from student readers is actually a positive sign. John Capouya, Jessica Keesee and Paola Crespo, University of Tampa • Conference Room L, Lower Level

10-10:50 a.m.  Saturday

Breaking in as a Woman: How Today's Female Journalists are Defying Odds and Taking Names: How do you break into the industry as a woman? Find out how to overcome very real obstacles, with anecdotes from female professionals in the news industry. And everyone can benefit from learning how to use skills and assets, how to be persistent and how to value personal perspective if it is unique, instead of seeing what makes you different as a disadvantage. Rebecca White, Narratively • Conference Room D, Lower Level

10-10:50 a.m. Saturday        

Cashing In: A Roundtable on Compensation in the College Newsroom: We want to get you paid -- or paid more -- for your work!  Come ready to discuss strategies for pursuing compensation for student newspaper staffs, particularly those who have previously been unpaid. Based on our research and own experiences, panelists will offer ideas on how to work around the most common and seemingly insurmountable obstacles.  We'll share compensation models from schools across the country and outline what may be the right fit for your outlet.            Jennifer Spinner and Marissa Marzano, Saint Joseph's University; Elizabeth Stone, Fordham College • Conference Room F, Lower Level

10-10:50 a.m. Saturday        

Designing Your Redesign: So, you want to redesign, but where do you start? A good redesign is driven by solid research and feedback from your readers. Learn how to get the opinions you need and then how to translate them into positive design upgrades and modifications that refresh your pages and readers. Make your redesign fab, not flab. Jessica Clary, SCAD Atlanta • Conference Room E, Lower Level

10-10:50 a.m.  Saturday

Never Use Comic Sans. Never. Ever. Type is all around us. Good type. Bad type. Learn what sets the good, the bad and the ugly apart. Your guide has worked for more than nine years in leading global advertising agencies developing and producing concepts for digital, print and TV. Jennifer Perry, Publicis Kaplan Thale • Conference Room K, Lower Level

10-10:50 a.m.  Saturday        

Online Video Editing: the Latest YouTube Tool for Journalists: Imagine you are reporting in the field with only a smartphone. Learn how you can work quick and dirty -- upload the video to YouTube and edit the clip using only your YouTube account. This approach could save the day when a backpack reporter is on deadline without all her equipment..Markus Pfeiffer, Regent University • Liberty 1&2, Third Floor

 10-10:50 a.m. Saturday

Picture Stories: More Than Just a Group of Pictures: Telling stories with photographs isn't easy. And it certainly doesn't mean just grouping together related images. The author of the Great Picture Hunt will show you how to tell stories that will capture the viewer -- through time, location or other meaningful ways -- and leave them wanting more. David LaBelle, Kent State University • Riverside Ballroom, Third Floor

10-10:50 a.m. Saturday

Publishing: Becoming a Career Book Lover: With a double major in graphic design and writing, this speaker developed her equal passions in visual and language arts while still in college ... and then got a career that encompassed both. Covering a basic outline of the publishing structure, she'll help attendees see their own journeys into the niches that best fit their talents. Jordan Wannemacher, Columbia University Press • Conference Room J, Lower Level

10-10:50 a.m. Saturday        

Roundtable for New Advisers: Any questions you forgot to ask?  What if your newspaper is a class? How do you work within student affairs? What if you don't have a journalism program? Still in need of some more mentoring in your new job as advisers? Join these veteran advisers for an informal discussion about your new position and its quirks. Sally Renaud, Eastern Illinois University; Bonnie Thrasher, Arkansas State University • Conference Room C, Lower Level

10-10:50 a.m. Saturday        

Student Radio Roundtable: Bring your ideas, your questions and your complaints to discuss the joys and challenges of college radio in this students-only roundtable discussion. Get together with colleagues from around the country to discuss recruiting new DJs, programming, promotions and much more. Conference Room H, Lower Level

10-10:50 a.m.  Saturday        

Student Television Roundtable: Bring your ideas, your questions and your complaints to discuss the joys and challenges of college television in this students-only roundtable discussion.  Get together with your college TV colleagues from around the country to discuss programming, promotions, equipment, technology and much more.  Sarah Violette, Quinnipiac University • Conference Room I, Lower Level

10-10:50 a.m.  Saturday        

The Amazing and Awesome AP Style News Quiz: Do you know the eight states that are never abbreviated? Are you a copy editors best friend? If you caught that error and love game shows, then this session is for you. All students are welcome to compete in this quiz based on the Associated Press Stylebook. The rules are simple: Answer the most random AP Style questions to win. The last person standing wins a spectacular prize and bragging rights. #APQuiz. Geoff Carr, North Idaho College • Liberty 3, Third Floor

10-10:50 a.m. Saturday

The Same but Different: The best work is inspired, not stolen. Yearbook staffs will examine professional designs, including magazines and other media, to help them create an amazing backdrop to the story of the year. Coverage of the same annual topics doesn't have to look or read the same. Get creative and find your own inspiration. Linda S. Puntney, Herff Jones •  Liberty 4, Third Floor

10-10:50 a.m. Saturday        

The Shape of Things to Come: Structuring Literary Journalism Stories: Writers and editors: Learn the six basic shapes stories can take (from circles to weaves) and become familiar with the concept of a governing metaphor as a structuring device. Walk away understanding how to put these literary tools to work in your stories. Pat Miller, Valdosta State University • Liberty 5, Third Floor

10-10:50 a.m. Saturday

Turbocharging InDesign: To design and produce print media, you need to know InDesign, in and out. Learn tips to make your hands move your mouse and fly over your keyboard as quickly as your mind comes up with ideas. The man who wrote the course on working faster and smarter in the software will show you how, for print and mobile. Joseph Caserto, Joseph Caserto Art Direction + Design  • New York East, Third Floor

10-10:50 a.m. Saturday

Word Smarts: Turning the Corner From Awful to Awesome: In today's whirlwind of speed and splash, it is easy to lose track of the substance of your media outlet. Learn how to improve content and make every paragraph come to life. Investing a little time in your writers now will save hours of frustration later. Using tips and tactics from our university writing center, we'll show how to get beyond the one-time fix and build a staff of skilled, confident writers that keep your readers coming back. Mary Bernath, Rae Meade and Adina Evans, Bloomsburg University • Conference Room B, Lower Level

11 a.m.-12 p.m.

Michael Skolnik Keynote • Metropolitan West, Second Floor

Noon-12:30 p.m. Saturday

David L. Adams Apple Awards: Following the closing keynote, see which people and pubs are the best of the best in NYC as CMA hands out its David L. Adams Apple Awards. Cheer on your friends, size up your competition and maybe take home a trophy of your own. College Media Association • Metropolitan West, Second Floor

Review schedules for Wednesday, Thursday and Friday.

(Photo by magurka from stock.xchng.)